Tech entrepreneur Jason Hope sees Internet of Things as future

Arizona tech entrepreneur Jason Hope has a lot to be hopeful about. Since the late 1990s, he’s been his own boss, founding and running a string of highly successful tech firms that have given him both freedom and experience. Jason Hope’s led an exciting life and has been privileged to be able to donate large sums to important charities.

But today, the self-described futurist is touting a new message: the Internet of Things is the premier industry of the future. Jason Hope says that in the coming years, we will all be wired in to the vast network of not just devices and computers but everything else in the world, including humans themselves.

Jason Hope has a long track record of seeing the future before anyone else. He’s no fortune teller though. His love of reading has compelled him to additively read publications like Wired and Popular Science as well as more technical journals like the Lancet and Nature since the time he was a young child. This dogged focus on the new and developing technologies of his time have led him to make some very sagacious bets. Jason Hope founded telephone content provider Jawa in the early 2000s, eventually selling the company. He also currently owns a couple of business software solutions companies and an SEO firm.

But to Hope, these are vanilla pursuits. Jason Hope is getting the word out about the coming revolution in networking technology that will drive the Internet of Things, the extension of the World Wide Web to almost every object imaginable.

The Internet of Things is a broad concept that entails everything from remotely monitored pacemakers to cans of soup with built-in remote identification chips. What it all has in common, though, is the power to utterly transform our environments in every way.

Very soon, things that once were in the realm of nutty science fiction will become reality. For example, totally automated shopping is only a few technological baby steps away. Once all food items are wired to the net, refrigerators themselves will be able to not only keep tabs on what’s in need of resupply, but will be able to execute shopping orders themselves.

With ID technology like RFID, automated carts will receive shopping orders directly from refrigerators, procure the items then have them waiting for the customer when they arrive at the store. In fact, many technologies of this type are already possible and will be rolled out in the next 5 to 10 years.

Learn More: About Technology Expert Jason Hope

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *