Gregory Aziz Behind Innovative National Steel Car Streetcars

All are well aware of the innovativeness and manufacturing excellence of National Steel Car. In the end, there were 48 HSR streetcars that were delivered in three batches. These were delivered over a span of three years. 23 arrived in 1927, followed by 12 in 1928, with 13 arriving in 1929.

Greg Aziz is well aware of the legacy of this company. In April 1927, the HSR 500 was publicly displayed at the Hamilton Terminal Station. It was the recipient of favorable reviews from the residents of Hamilton who viewed it. A lot of NSC cars were delivered by May. These took over the Beltline route. They were the two-man cars.

 

HSR system was changed as the first big group came in of single-ended cars. It led to the construction of Westdale and Longwood Loops. This allowed these new cars to turn at the end of their routes. The city did not permit constructing new loops which would be required at the end of the York and the Burlington routes. This is why the York route would be serviced by the double-ended cars for several years. The NSC cars would run along Burlington and then travel down Kenilworth.

James Aziz further clarified that these were the only streetcars which were painted in the paint scheme of the Canada Coach Lines in 1946. There used to be a thin orange stripe which was placed under the windows. In some streetcars, this stripe was either removed or not added.

 

These NSC streetcars served in Hamilton till 1951. Then these cars were stored and eventually sold in 1951 to the International Metal Company. The trucks and electrical equipment were stripped off. Out of these, eight streetcar bodies were sold to private owners who used them as buildings. 39 of these were resold to Dofasco. These were cut up for scrap in 1952.

The length of these cars was 40 ft. 11 in and a width of 8 ft. 3.5 in beside a height of 10 ft. 9 in. They could seat 53 and weighed 37 000 lbs.

 

HSR 505 made by National Steel Car was used for crossing the McKittrick bridge. It used to make noise while crossing the cast-iron bridge. This noise could be heard in Westdale clearly, which was nearly a kilometer to the west. This bridge was demolished later.

 

Gregory J. Aziz is aimed at taking this legacy still further. Read This Article for more information.

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